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From Internship to a Full-Time Job: How to Make it Happen?

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Estimated reading time: 5 mins

Internships are temporary work programs where workers can gain professional experience and acquire skills and training. If you’re a student, first-time job seeker, or even someone who’s changing careers, you can consider internship programs alongside full-time positions when finding jobs in the Philippines. Doing so will open up more doors of opportunities for you.

Moreover, internship programs can help you find full-time job posts. Some companies offer these programs to evaluate candidates in actual work settings before hiring them as an employee. For this reason, you can turn a short-term opportunity into a full-time offer. Here are four ways to show your employer that you have what it takes to become a valuable employee. 

Communicate Your Career Goal Early

Express your interest in being hired for a full-time position during the interview process or in the first few weeks of your internship. It’s important to inform your manager of your end goal. Otherwise, they might assume that you’re just using the program as a stepping stone before moving to a different opportunity.   

Even if there are no open positions currently available in your company, telling your manager of your interest will allow them to think of you as a possible applicant. When a position does open up, your manager will be more likely to recommend you for it or relay the opportunity to you so you can apply through the proper channels. 

Present Yourself as a Reliable Intern

To present yourself as a reliable intern, you should show up to work on time or earlier and accomplish tasks assigned to you promptly. You should also make sure to deliver good quality work whenever you can and to do your work with enthusiasm. This is important because your duties impact other people’s responsibilities, even if you’re just an intern. Furthermore, if you can be trusted to accomplish these small tasks, your supervisor will be more willing to rely on you for more difficult jobs in the future. 

In addition, your enthusiasm shows your coworkers and supervisor that you’re ready and willing to take on more work. Do not be the kind of intern who complains about doing menial tasks. Even if they seem easy or unimportant, you can use them as opportunities to develop your skills and build rapport with your colleagues. If you are difficult to work with, people will be less likely to trust you and you might miss out on more important assignments. 

Do More Than What’s Expected of You

As you start your internship, you will likely have a list of things you need to do daily, but you should strive to do more than just these tasks whenever possible. You can show initiative and ask your supervisor for more work or responsibility. You can also request to attend meetings to learn more about the company’s projects and operations, then offer to take notes or minutes as a way to get involved. 

If your supervisor believes that your current tasks are enough, you can offer your assistance to coworkers if they need any help. Doing so will introduce you to more of the work processes involved and allow you to become a more integral member of the team. 

You can also do more by suggesting ways to improve work efficiency, not only with your tasks but with the workflow of the team. Doing so will show your creativity and potential to contribute to the team’s success. For example, your company may not be using software to keep track of each employee’s work progress, which can result in project delays. If you can suggest a system or program they can use, it can help with meeting timelines and make collaborating easier.  

Request for Feedback and Evaluation

In case your internship program doesn’t involve giving you feedback regularly, don’t be afraid to ask your manager. Asking for feedback will help you see where you can improve, and most managers will be able to give you advice on how you can perform better. Feedback and evaluation sessions are also a good time to share your own accomplishments, especially if you spearheaded any projects or suggested new ideas during meetings. Some managers won’t be able to keep track of your achievements, so this will be the perfect time to update them on your progress. 

Aside from your supervisor, you should also request evaluation from your coworkers and peers. These people work the closest with you, so they know your work ethic better. They may be able to easily identify your weaknesses, give you new insights and perspectives based on their own experiences, and even suggest ways to develop yourself if your supervisor can’t. Moreover, they can better recognize and commend your contribution to the team, which may boost your confidence while you work.

Establish Connections within the Company

Connect with your peers, coworkers, and supervisors beyond a professional level. When you establish a somewhat personal relationship with the people around you, you improve your working relationship, enabling you to collaborate with them better. You can connect with your team members by asking them about their weekend, their hobbies, or finding a common interest, like music, movies, or TV shows.

Additionally, if your peers and coworkers like working with you and relay this feedback to your supervisor, this may encourage them to keep you for a full-time position. Even if your company doesn’t give you a full-time offer, your connections may be able to suggest or recommend you to other opportunities. Although internship programs are temporary work programs, they can give you real-world experiences, build up your skills, and even develop your professional connections. If you work smart and make the most of every opportunity, you may even be able to turn your internship into full-time employment. Apply the tips above during your program to make a good impression on your colleagues and potentially secure your position in the company for the long-term. 

 

About the author /


Simon is a creative and passionate business leader dedicated to having fun in the pursuit of high performance and personal development. He is co-founder of Truthsayers Neurotech, the world's first Neurotech platform servicing the enterprise. Simon is also an Ambassador for Gloucestershire business. Simon is an Associate Member of the Chartered Institute of Professional Development and Associate Member of the Agile Business Consortium.

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