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Why be Happy in our work?

LoveMyJob

LoveMyJob

Estimated reading time: 5 mins

Work is important to us. It fills most of our day. So why not be happy in it?

If you’ve read my post ‘Why We Work’ you’ll have seen the science that goes behind our motivations; work is important in terms of generating income, creating opportunities to do interesting things, influencing how we view ourselves , and producing products and services needed by our communities, country and global economy.

First, let’s be clear on the answer to an important question: Are happy people more successful than their less happy colleagues in their work?

Well, according to research conducted by the American Psychological Association, happiness is a proven factor in our performance at work. The research states:

Once a happy person obtains a job, he or she is more likely to succeed. Employees high in dispositional positive affect receive relatively more favorable evaluations from supervisors and others”;

and that

one of the reasons that happy, satisfied workers are more likely to be high performers on the job is that they are less likely to show “job withdrawal”—namely, absenteeism, turnover, job burnout, and retaliatory behaviours

Being happy, it would seem, makes us likely to perform well in our work.

What else does being happy do for us?

How to Become Happier at Work

Perhaps a simple answer: do more of the things that make you happy more often.

Try that for size. Make room for them. Make time for them. Treat yourself. Don’t let anything get in your way.

There are things we can do in our job that can increase our happiness too.

According to AOL  Jobs,  there are five proven ways to increase your happiness at work:

In addition, I have other personal tips I’ve used before:

And lastly, take a look at these great resources:

  1. 10 Steps to Happiness at Work
  2. Achieve Anything in Just One Year: Be Inspired Daily to Live Your Dreams and Accomplish Your Goals
  3. The Happiness Habit: Choose the Path to a Better Life

This post is part 9 of 22 in the series Working & Living
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